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Decoding Eye Emergencies

Stye

Stye

A stye is not a serious threat to your vision. If you think you're developing one, a good first step is to apply heat.
Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer of the eyelid. It's usually found on the lower lid because of sun exposure.
Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma needs to be treated and removed as soon as possible. It has the ability to spread.
Subconjuctival hemmorage

Subconjuctival hemmorage

Think of a subconjuctival hemmorage as "the worst looking red eye". It may look bad, but in reality it's the least dangerous eye emergency. It behaves like a bruise, and can last a bit more than a week.
Hyphema

Hyphema

A hyphema occurs when blood is not just in the white of the eye (red eye) but inside the eye itself. This is a serious red flag, and should be treated by a doctor immediately.
Allergic Conjunctivitis

Allergic Conjunctivitis

Allergic conjunctivitis is common in southeast Louisiana due to the many allergens in the air. Look for small bumps on the inside of your eyelid.
Viral Conjunctivitis

Viral Conjunctivitis

Viral conjunctivitis is the most contagious virus second to the chicken pox. The main culprit for the spread? Elevator buttons.
Bacterial Conjunctivitis

Bacterial Conjunctivitis

Bacterial conjunctivitis requires an antibiotic - it will not go away on its own. It also usually involves both eyes.
Retinal Detachment

Retinal Detachment

The retina is held in place by suction, not by any sort of apparatus inside your eye. Warning signs of retinal detachment include an onset of flashing lights, floating spots, cobwebs in vision, or curtains setting. Post-cataract surgery patients are at an increased risk of retinal detachment.

Do you know what to look for when it comes to a major eye emergency? Common eye ailments include styes, basal cell carcinoma, and allergic conjunctivitis. If you think you have an eye problem or emergency, call your eye doctor right away rather than heading straight to the ER. 

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